Paradise Valley introduces red-light collision prevention technology

(Photo by KPHO 5)

(Photo by KPHO 5)

The Town of Paradise Valley became the first municipality in the state to implement an intelligent collision prevention technology that’s designed to protect drivers, pedestrians and other road users from motorists who run red lights.

At the intersection of Lincoln Drive and Tatum Boulevard, Redflexred Halo will augment the existing photo radar system that detects red-light running and speeding incidents.

In addition to capturing evidence of incidents, Halo extends the all-red phase for cross-traffic when it detects a vehicle could run a red light, according to a press release.

Law-abiding drivers in cross-traffic lanes stay put while the incident is captured on camera, greatly reducing the chances a deadly situation could occur.

“Red-light running leads to broadside, or “T-bone” crashes, which are the deadliest types of crashes on our roadways,” stated Paradise Valley Lt. Michael Horn in the release. “We’ve made great strides over the years in reducing red-light running, but some drivers still do not heed the deterrents. This technology will help ensure the safety of law-abiding drivers while still holding violators accountable.”

Halo will monitor drivers heading eastbound and westbound on Lincoln Drive. Halo is manufactured and provided by Redflex Traffic Systems, Inc., a North American leader in road safety technology. It has operated the Town’s photo radar program since 2001.

“Paradise Valley has been an innovator in photo enforcement for many years,” stated Redflex CEO Michael Finn in the release. “We applaud their efforts to introduce this life-saving technology, and we’re confident the public will be safer as a result.”

Paradise Valley uses photo radar to detect and deter red-light running at five intersections throughout the town. It also uses fixed and mobile photo radar systems to monitor speeding.

Visit http://www.ci.paradise-valley.az.us/153/Photo-Radar for more information about Paradise Valley’s photo radar program.

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