Apple approves Arizona-based tech company’s iOS App, Raadr

(submitted screen shot of Raadr app download page)

(submitted screen shot of Raadr app download page)

Parents can now hold peace of mind in the palm of their hand.

Raadr, Inc., a social media monitoring service based in Phoenix, announced it is available in app form. Apple approved the company’s iOS app Sunday, March 27, which can be downloaded via iTunes.

Raadr alerts subscribers whenever selected categories of keywords – such as bullying, drugs or sex, for example – are detected on a specific child’s social media feeds. Raadr uses an artificially intelligent proprietary web-based application to achieve these results, according to a press release.

“We are very excited to be able to create more value for our existing customers and to have the added proposition to help us market to new customers,” stated CEO Jacob DiMartino, in the release. “Our Android app will come right on the heels of this release and that will expand our reach even more. This, in combination with our community outreach programs, will really spur growth for us.”

The app is free to download, and users can register for a free two-month trial with the code BULLYRAADR. After the trial, the service costs $4.95 per month.

iPhone and iPad users can download the app here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/raadr/id1090444233?mt=8

According to a recent study from the Pew Research Center, 60 percent of parents have checked their teen’s social media profiles in an attempt to monitor their interactions online, the release stated. That number is relatively high in comparison to parents who use monitoring devices or parental controls. Only 39 percent of parents use technology to block, filter or monitor their children’s activities online.

For more stats, follow us on social media: facebook.com/raadr2015 and @raadr_

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